Minnesota Department of Transportation

511 Travel Info

MAP-21

Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century

Safety

Highway Safety Improvement Program

Implementation of MAP-21 increases the amount in the HSIP beginning in 2017 to $31 million annually, excluding rail-highway. The program’s focus is to reduce fatal and serious injuries on all public roads. MAP-21 requires a performance-based plan. The Strategic Highway Improvement Plan will be updated over the next year and will identify strategies to reduce fatal and serious injuries. Two special rules for high-risk rural roads and older drivers become effective.

Solicitation process

HSIP funds are distributed using three separate decision groups:

  • Met Council HSIP
  • Greater Minnesota Combined Solicitation
  • MnDOT districts

Each solicitation uses a risk-based analysis (Road Safety Plans) to select projects.

Lower cost, systemic treatments such as lighting, signage, rumble strips and enhanced edgelines are the focus of the Greater Minnesota projects. Any entity eligible for State Aid funds can apply directly to the Greater Minnesota Combined Solicitation. Cities and tribes not State Aid Eligible must apply for HSIP funds through their county.

In Greater Minnesota, a minimum of 70 percent of projects awarded to an ATP (Area Transportation Partnership) will be systemic and a maximum of 30 percent will address spot locations (reactive).

In the Metro District, 70 percent of the projects will address spot locations (reactive) and 30 percent will be systemic.

All three groups use the same tools to evaluate and prioritize projects. Systemic projects are evaluated using risk-based assessments (Road Safety Plans). Reactive projects are evaluated using critical crash rates that demonstrate the location has a sustained crash history and a benefit/cost ratio greater than one.

More information on the solicitation processes can be found at: www.dot.state.mn.us/trafficeng/safety/funding/.

The table below shows potential funding targets aligned with the distribution of fatal and serious injury crashes within area transportation partnership (ATP) boundaries. Funding will be prioritized on a statewide basis for projects that show the greatest safety benefit. As a result the actual distribution of funds may be different than the target dollar value shown in the table.

Initial funding distribution estimated to be available for HSIP beginning in 2017:

ATP

% Fatal & Serious Injury Crashes

Total HSIP by ATP

*State Highways

*Local Roads

1

8.3%

2,573,000

1,237,822

1,335,178

2

4.9%

1,519,000

661,650

857,350

3

14.6%

4,526,000

1,870,954

2,655,046

4

6.7%

2,077,000

926,662

1,150,338

6

11.7%

3,627,000

1,417,539

2,209,461

7

7.9%

2,449,000

1,037,315

1,411,685

8

6.9%

2,139,000

991,042

1,147,958

M

39.0%

12,090,000

3,735,630

8,354,370

TOTAL

100.0%

31,000,000

11,878,614

19,121,386

*HSIP targets based on 2009-2011 crash data
A serious injury crash is one that results in a life altering injury

Performance measures

Traffic fatalities and serious injuries on all public roads will be measured against performance targets.

  • The U.S. Secretary of Transportation published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish safety performance measures and HSIP standards. The comment period closed on June 30, 2014. The Secretary is reviewing comments and will notify the states when the final rule is published. The NPRM’s and Comment Dockets can be viewed at http://www.fhwa.gov/tmp/rule/cfm
  • No later than one year after rulemaking, states will set performance targets, which may be different for urban and rural.

New rules

MAP-21 introduces two new rules related to high risk rural roads and older drivers:

  • High-Risk Rural Roads
    If the fatality rate on rural roads in a state increases over the most recent two-year period for which data is available, that state is required to set aside in the next fiscal year for projects an amount equal to at least 200 percent of the amount of funds the state received for fiscal year 2009. This is under subsection (f) of this section, and is in effect on the day before the date of enactment of the MAP-21.
    • Minnesota received $1.8 million for High Risk Rural Roads in 2009. If this special rule applied, in 2014, Minnesota would have to obligate $3.6 million.
    • Minnesota’s current fatality rate per 100MVMT High Risk Rural Roads (using the FHWA’s definition of High Risk Rural Roads) is as follows:
      • Rate for 2010 = 1.7
      • Rate for 2012 = 1.6
    • Since Minnesota’s rate did not increase from 2010 to 2012, the High Risk Rural Roads Special rule does not apply in 2014.
  • Older Driver
    If traffic fatalities and serious injuries per capita for drivers and pedestrians over the age of 65 in a state increase during the most recent two-year period for which data is available, that state will be required to include, in the subsequent Strategic Highway Safety Plan, (SHSP), strategies to address the increases in those rates. States must take into account the recommendations included in the Federal Highway Administration’s 'Highway Design Handbook for Older Drivers and Pedestrians' (FHWA-RD-01-103), dated May 2001, or as subsequently revised and updated.
    • Minnesota’s current rate of Fatal (F) and Serious Injuries (SI) per capita for drivers and pedestrians 65 years of age and older are as follows:
      • Rate for 2010 = 1.3
      • Rate for 2012 = 1.1
    • Since Minnesota’s rate did not increase from 2010 to 2012; the Older Driver Special rule does not apply in 2014.